Sunday, July 22, 2007

Storm reports for 19 July 2007

Prepared 7:00 pm MST 22 July 2007

As things turned out, the 19th was a very active storm day in SE AZ - refer to previous post.

There are many severe events documented under storm reports at the SPC page.

Here at the house, the event was mostly wind and dust followed by some nighttime trailing rain.
There was a very bad dust storm here right before dark. The Catalina Mountains were totally obscured when the gust front blew in - I don't think that I've observed that before. At atmo the roof-top anemometer registered gusts to ~ 75 mph. Unfortunately, there was not enough light for me to get photos.

In Phoenix, Skyharbor airport reported gusts to 55 mph. There was a fatality due to power lines downed by the outflow - BUT, although I have seen numerous newspaper accounts of this death that occurred after the storms moved through, I don't find any severe storm reports at SPC.

However, the most amazing storm report for the 19th was copied to me by NWS forecaster Jeff Davis. A very severe, westward moving supercell ocurred in Mexico, just south of the border.

It hit the town of Cananea (see map), and produced, at a minimum, a spectacular hailstorm. The Tucson NWS Doppler radar documented an impressive mesocyclone with this storm. Since the storm was moving toward the WSW, the mesocyclone was located on the right flank of the storm, i.e., the north flank of the storm. The four-level reflectivity product and the four-level
Doppler velocities indicate the intense nature of this storm a bit after 00 UTC (5 pm MST).

1 comment:

  1. Anonymous7:45 PM

    Bob and Jeff,

    Thanks a bunch for posting this event. Although I haven't investigated Sonoran supercells much in a research sense (concentrating instead on Serranias del Burro storms in NE Mexico, adjacent to the DRT area), this is a fascinating case no less.

    Also, it's a splendid example (in a teaching sense) of how to turn around one's kinematic frame of reference while maintaining favorable supercell environments. I could see a synoptic met professor -- teaching the severe storms secion -- having all kinds of fun mixing this "monsoonal supercell" in with some NW-moving TC supercells in the northern hemisphere, and assorted southern hemisphere cases, to keep students on their toes.

    ===== Roger =====

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